Comparison eight weeks aerobic and Yoga training on Pulmonary function indices and maximal oxygen consumption in untrained women

AUTHORS

Mohammad Hossein Bagheri , *

How to Cite: Bagheri M H. Comparison eight weeks aerobic and Yoga training on Pulmonary function indices and maximal oxygen consumption in untrained women, Jentashapir J Health Res. Online ahead of Print ; 5(3):153-158.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Jentashapir Journal of Health Research: 5 (3); 153-158
Article Type: Rapid Communication

Crossmark

CHEKING

READ FULL TEXT
Abstract

Background: Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2MAX) Forced Vital Capacity(FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume(FEV1) and Maximum Voluntary Ventilation(MVV) are important indicators of Pulmonary functions that show physical health and physical activity of individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of yoga and aerobic trainings on Pulmonary functions parameters in untrained women.

Thirty (Healthy and untrained) women (MeanSD;age:26.534.98yr, height:1.600.53m, weight:72.66 14.94kg, BMI:28.525.82kg/m2)volunteered to participate in this study. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups (yoga, aerobic and control) of 10 persons on basis of BMI of 10 persons. The training groups (yoga and aerobic) participated in their special exercise program during eight weeks, 3days in a week, a session in each day and every session lasted for 1 hour. Before and after training sessions, all Pulmonary function parameters (FVC, FEV1and MVV) were measured by spirometer, and VO2MAX were examined by Shuttle Run Test in all three groups. Descriptive statistics, analysis of covariate (ANCOVA) and Scheffe post hoc test were used for analyze the data.

Results: The results showed significant increases in Pulmonary indexes (FVC, FEV1and MVV) and VO2MAX in both yoga and aerobic groups compared to control group(p<0.05).

Conclusion: Overall the results showed that there is no significant differences between eight week yoga and aerobic exercise in indicators of Pulmonary function and VO2MAX..

Keywords

© 0, Jentashapir Journal of Health Research. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

Full Text

Full text is available in PDF

COMMENTS

LEAVE A COMMENT HERE: